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Crystal Bridges, part 3

29 May

The Crystal Bridges art collection offers a superb overview of American art including American masterworks as well as surprising, lesser-known gems from the Colonial era to contemporary work. Sculpture in the collection graces interior galleries and outdoor trails. —Art page, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art website

I was at the Museum this past weekend, wandering the galleries and grounds. Previous blog posts (1, 2) have dealt with the exterior and the walking trails, but this post will include some of the artwork currently on display.

When I say I am an amateur photographer, I mean it. Not only am I limited in lens selection, but in skill and knowledge, but I’m open to learning and experimenting. Therefore, most of the photos here were highly edited in order to counteract the dim lighting and crowded gallery. Still, I hope you enjoy them.

Lafayette -- not handsome by any means, but his face is commanding.  (Marquis de Lafayette, oil on canvas, 1825, Samuel Finley Breese Morse, co-developer of Morse code) (c2014, KB)

Lafayette — not handsome by any means, but his face is commanding. (Marquis de Lafayette, oil on canvas, 1825, Samuel Finley Breese Morse) (c2014, KB)

The artist was also the co-developer of Morse code, and the man for whom Samuel F.B. Morse High School in San Diego, California, is named. I attended there in the late 1980s.

(c2014, KB)

(c2014, KB)

I don’t recall the name of this sculpture or its artist, but it’s of a Native American couple, him down on one knee, an arm around her as she perches on his other knee. The front is nice, but the details here were more interesting.

The Indian and the Lily, oil on canvas, 1887, George de Forest Brush

The Indian and the Lily, oil on canvas, 1887, George de Forest Brush

This is one of my mom’s favorite pieces in the whole museum, but neither of us can afford a print of it just now.

Proserpine, marble, 1840, Hiram Powers

Proserpine, marble, 1840, Hiram Powers

In the background, Mrs. Jacob Franks (Abigaill Levy) looks over the shoulder of the bare-breasted Goddess of Spring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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